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Acute coronary syndromes Part 2: New guidelines and therapeutic options for UA and STEMI

Cardiology
Curriculum:
Acute coronary syndromes: New guidelines and therapeutics
Credits:
1 AANP Contact Hours 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
Launch Date:
October 07, 2014
Expiration Date:
The accreditation for this activity has expired.

Primary Audience:

ER Physicians, Cardiologists, Hospitalists, Primary Care MD/DO, and NPs/PAs and other clinicians managing patients with ACS

Relevant Terms:

Acute Coronary Syndromes, NSTEMI, Unstable Angina, STEMI, Antiplatelet Therapy, Discharge Planning

Carl R. Reynolds, M.D., FACC

Carl R. Reynolds, M.D., FACC
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine                                                              
Perelman University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Carl Reynolds graduated from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He completed internal medicine residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and stayed for an additional chief residency year at the same institution. He did general cardiology training at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, SC, and, finally, one year of electrophysiology training at the Hospital the University of Pennsylvania. He is now on the faculty of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University Pennsylvania as a noninvasive and consultative cardiologist with a special interest in arrhythmia management.

Valerian L. Fernandes, MD, MRCP, FACC

Valerian L. Fernandes, MD, MRCP, FACC
Associate Professor of Medicine
Medical University of South Carolina
Director- Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories
Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center
Charleston, SC

Valerian Fernandes is Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the Director of Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at Ralph H Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, and Nuclear Cardiology. Dr. Fernandes’ clinical and research interests include complex coronary interventions, rotational atherectomy, percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty, alcohol septal ablation and hemodynamic Echocardiography. He is the Principal Investigator in sev­eral trials and has co-authored many publications. He is very active in medical educa­tion and has received the MUSC Outstanding Teacher Award and Michael Assey Excellence in Cardiology teaching award on numerous occasions. He is a reviewer for medical journals and a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology.
 
Dr. Fernandes received his MBBS degree from St John’s Medical College, Bangalore and his M.D. (Internal Medicine) from Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) Chandigarh, India following which he received his MRCP, UK in 1994. He did his internship at St. Luke-Roosevelt Hospital NY and his Internal Medicine Residency at the Mayo Clinic, MN followed by Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology fellowships at the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

William H. Matthai, Jr., MD, FACC

William H. Matthai, Jr., MD, FACC
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine
Perelman University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Matthai graduated from Vanderbilt Medical School and did his residency and fellowship at the Hospital of the University of PA. He did an additional year of training in Interventional Cardiology at the same institution. Currently, he is on the faculty at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and an Interventional Cardiologist, primarily working out of Penn Presbyterian Medical Center in Philadelphia.  He is Director of Cardiology Clinical Research at Penn Presbyterian as well.
1. Review strategies for the diagnosis and risk stratification of unstable angina (UA),  ST-segment myocardial infarction (STEMI), and non-ST-segment myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)
2. Discuss the most recent recommendations for the initial management of patients with UA/NSTEMI or STEMI
3. Utilize appropriate discharge medications for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients
4. Communicate with patients the need for long-term therapy to prevent recurrent thrombotic events after ACS

Planning Committee
Gregg Sherman, MD
Family Practice
Northwest Heart and Heath
Margate, FL
 
Harvey C. Parker, Ph.D., CCMEP
National Association for Continuing Education
Plantation, FL
 
Joshua Kilbridge, President
Kilbridge Associates            
San Francisco, CA
 
PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a potentially life-threatening form of coronary artery disease (CAD), accounts for over 1.4 million hospital admissions in the United States every year. About 9-19% of ACS patients die in the first 6 months after diagnosis, with about one-half of these deaths occurring within 30 days of diagnosis.  Manifestations of ACS include unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction (ST-segment elevation MI [STEMI] and non-STEMI [NSTEMI]), and sudden cardiac death. Risk estimation is important for optimal patient care in ACS and risk assessment tools such as the TIMI and GRACE algorithms can assist in assessing the risk of death and ischemic events, thereby providing a basis for therapeutic decision making.
 
The management of ACS aims at immediate relief of ischemia, reduction in the size of infarct, and prevention of serious adverse events, including death, (recurrent) MI or severe ischemia, and arrhythmias. Antithrombotic therapies for patients with definite ACS include aspirin, thienopyridines, unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists and newer antiplatelet agents, antithrombins and fibrinolytics, and invasive therapies. Knowledge of specific drugs for acute, and long-term, management is important for optimizing the risk-benefit ratio.

This program will help to bridge the knowledge and performance gaps related to identification, risk stratification, and management of ACS as well as patient communication strategies. There are two activities in this curriculum. Each activity in the series will begin with a brief didactic topic overview followed by two “Patient Continua,” each consisting of the presentation of a patient’s interaction with health care team over a period of time. The patients selected for these continua will all have different presentations and different outcomes. This approach will allow for the curriculum to address four different patient presentations and fully address assessment, diagnosis, initial management, and follow-up management. 
 
DISCLOSURE POLICY STATEMENT:
It is the policy of NACE to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its educational activities. NACE assesses conflict of interest with its faculty, planners and managers of CME activities. Conflicts of interest that are identified are resolved by reviewing that presenter's content for fair balance and absence of bias, scientific objectivity of studies utilized in this activity, and patient care recommendations.
 
While NACE endeavors to review faculty content, it remains the obligation of each physician or other healthcare practitioner to determine the applicability or relevance of the information provided from this course in his or her own practice.
 
DISCLOSURE OF CONFLICTS OF INTEREST:
 
Faculty
William H. Matthai, Jr., MD, FACC, Course Director, has the following relationships to disclose: Investigator Medicor International, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZenca.
 
Carl R. Reynolds, M.D., FACC, faculty, has no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report. 
 
Valerian L. Fernandes, MD, MRCP, FACC faculty, has no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report. 
 
Planning Committee
Gregg Sherman, MD, has no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report. 
 
Harvey Parker, PhD, has no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report. 
 
Josh Kilbridge has no real or apparent conflicts of interest to report. 
 
DISCLOSURE OF UNLABELED USE:
NACE requires that faculty participating in any CME activity disclose to the audience when discussing any unlabeled or investigational use of any commercial product or device not yet approved for use in the United States.
 
DISCLAIMER
The opinions expressed during the educational activity are those of the faculty and do not necessarily represent the views of NACE. The information is presented for the purpose of advancing the attendees' professional development.
 
ACCREDITATION STATEMENT:
The National Association for Continuing Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
National Association for Continuing Education is approved as a provider of nurse practitioner continuing education by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. AANP Provider Number 121222. 
 
This CME activity was planned and produced in accordance with the ACCME Essentials and the AANP CE Standards and Policies and AANP Commercial Support Standards.
 
For CME questions, please contact: NACE at info@naceonline.com
 
Contact this CME provider for privacy and confidentiality policy statement information at:
http://www.naceonline.com/privacy_policy.php
 
CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT:
NACE designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
 
National Association for Continuing Education is approved as a provider of nurse practitioner continuing education by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. AANP Provider Number 121222. This program has been approved for 1.0 hrs contact hours of continuing education (which includes 0.5 hour of pharmacology credit)
 
TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS:
  • Read the learning objectives and faculty disclosures.
  • Participate in the activity.
  • Complete the post-test and activity evaluation.
  • Physicians who successfully complete the post-test and evaluation will receive CME credit.
  • Nurse Practitioners who successfully complete the post-test and evaluation will receive AANP CE credit.
  • You must score 60% or higher on the post-test to receive credit for this activity.
  • All other participants who successfully complete the post-test and evaluation will receive a certificate of participation.
COURSE FORMAT/MEDIUM: Internet CME Activity
 
ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE: 60 minutes
 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:
This activity is sponsored by National Association for Continuing Education.
 
                                
This educational activity is supported by an educational grant from Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., and Lilly. For further information concerning Lilly grant funding visit www.lillygrantoffice.com.
 
If you have any questions regarding this activity, send an email to info@naceonline.com.
   
Copyright © 2014 National Association for Continuing Education. All rights reserved. These materials may be used for personal use only. Any rebroadcast, distribution, or reuse of this presentation or any part of it in any form for other than personal use without the express written permission of NACE is prohibited.
 
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